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2 Shows, 34 Tracks

Cheap Trick

Emerging from the Chicago suburbs in the mid/late 1970s, Cheap Trick's fuzzy Power Pop stood out amidst a rock/pop field of aging dinosaurs (the Who, Zeppelin), nihilistic punks (the Pistols) and cheesy Disco (the Bee Gees). Combined with singer Robin Zander's sex appeal and careening vocals, guitarist Rick Nielsen's penchant for loud guitar hooks have written the quartet some gigantic checks over the years, particularly after the multi-platinum live record At Budokan made them superstars around the end of the '70s. Legendary hits such as "Southern Girls" and "I Want You To Want Me" bounced, rocked and rolled with electrifying fervor, helping to jump-start an American Power Pop scene that had stalled in the mid-'70s with the demise of Big Star and the Raspberries. Cheap Trick took those bands' supreme sense of melody and cranked the amps up louder than they ever did: "Surrender" remains the loudest catchy song -- and the catchiest loud song -- this side of the Replacements. The band has continued in the decades since, enduring a fallow, big-haired period in the '80s and widespread reverence in the '90s from younger bands wishing to carry on the Power Pop flame.

Cheap Trick Concert Films

  • Front Row Center

    Cheap Trick

    Year: 2010

    Runtime: 55 min

    Well known for their four decades of almost non-stop touring and new music, the group combines their famous power pop and melodic sounds as they rock out in this special concert. Seventeen studio albums under their belt make for so many great songs including favorites like 'Surrender,' 'Dream Police' and 'I Want You to Want Me.'
     
     
  • Live in Budokan

    Cheap Trick

    Year: 2016

    Runtime: 1 hr 26 min

    Studio releases never fully conveyed Cheap Trick’s muscle, but the band harnessed the raw energy of their live show with 1978’s At Budokan (Live). Recorded in Tokyo before 12,000 feverish fans, “Hello There” and “Lookout” are the dictionary definition of how live rock ’n’ roll should sound. A cover of “Ain’t That a Shame” highlights the band’s connection to a timeless tradition of teen-rock abandon, but “Surrender” and “I Want You to Want Me” are the gold coins that secured them their own space in the rock canon.
     
     

Cheap Trick Top Tracks