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3 Shows, 66 Tracks

Rage Against The Machine

Rage Against the Machine's militant political stance straddles an equally militant sound. Furious riffs churn out of Tom Morello's guitar and dive into grinding psychedelics -- the American music of opposition. But these are the sounds of a culture that is too angry for '60s passive resistance. The wah-wah pedal is a call to action. The urgency of Zack de la Rocha's frantic podium rants are taken out of the riot directing bullhorn and put into percussive rap poetics. Key to RATM's appeal is their fusion of some of America's most political musical movements: the liberation sounds of funk, the anarchistic resistance of punk, the angry alienation of metal, and the urban exasperation of hip-hop creating a revolutionary synergy on all four studio albums. De La Rocha left the band in 2000 to pursue a solo career while his bandmates went on to form Audioslave with Chris Cornell of Soundgarden on vocals. In 2007, Rage were received with open arms as they re-grouped and returned to performing and politicking.

Rage Against The Machine Concert Films

  • Live at the Grand Olympic Auditorium

    Rage Against The Machine

    Year: 2003

    Runtime: 2 hr 4 min

    Rage Against The Machine return to their hometown of Los Angeles for an uncompromising, incendiary set in Live At The Grand Olympic Auditorium, the final dates of their Battle of Los Angeles tour and the band's last shows until their 2007 reunion.
     
     
  • The Battle of Mexico City

    Rage Against The Machine

    Year: 1999

    Runtime: 1 hr 35 min

    Outside Mexico City's Sports Pavilion, hundreds of young Rage fans rattle metal fences and throw rocks at the increasingly nervous police. Inside, a seething crowd of 5,000 lucky ticket holders cram into the cavernous pavilion chanting anti-government slogans and poking their middle fingers into the thick, sweaty air while waiting for Rage Against the Machine to storm the stage.

    One of the greatest live acts in music history, Rage only affirms that fact with this show. Whatever club, theater, arena, or stadium they're in, the opening of each Rage Against the Machine show always feels like a grenade has gone off. But this night it was as if a truckful of bombs blew up as the band tore into the opening salvo of "Testify." Fans cascaded toward the stage like rippling waves stopping only to pogo up-and-down like jackhammers.

    Longtime supporters of various political causes in Mexico, Rage were performing for the very first time in Mexico City. The connection between the band and the audience is electric. From the early "all hell can't stop us now" chant in "Guerilla Radio" to the blood-curling screams in the finale of "Freedom," there is an urgency at this show that is unrivaled. This is live rock & roll as it's meant to be heard: fierce, funky, uncompromising. This is Rage Against the Machine in their finest hour.
     
     
  • The Video

    Rage Against The Machine

    Year: 1997

    Runtime: 1 hr 24 min

    Rage Against the Machine released this self-titled film in 1997, collecting live concert footage and music videos of some of their best material. The band starts with a passionate rendition of Bruce Springsteen's "Ghost of Tom Joad" live from the Irvine Meadows in Irvine, CA. The well-filmed performance captures Rage near the top of their game. Seeing Zack de la Rocha interact with a large crowd and the band work a tight, incendiary groove is required to understand the appeal of the now-defunct political rock band. This is underscored by "People of the Sun" and four other songs live from the Rock Am Ring Festival in Germany, where Rage plays before what must be 100,000 people. The second half of the film is filled with six music videos, including "Freedom" and "Memory of the Dead (Land and Liberty)."
     
     

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