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5 Shows, 63 Tracks

Nirvana

The phenomenal success of Foo Fighters demonstrates that Nirvana were a talented trio, and not just a rickety pair of training wheels for Kurt Cobain's wild ride into fame and annihilation. Obscured behind a smokescreen of publicity and deadened by the effects of endless radio play, Nirvana's music nonetheless holds its own as some of the very best of the 1990s. Krist Novoselic, Dave Grohl and Cobain managed to direct molten flows of white noise into melodic channels navigable by mainstream listeners. Cobain's lyrics, meanwhile, were imbued with the Pentecostal passion of someone speaking in tongues. Traveling in rapid pendulum swings from mania to catatonia, his singing conveyed the pain of a soul mortgaged deep in addiction and depression. He was a man trying desperately to make sense, through song, of the world around him -- something not often heard in Top-40 music. It's unfortunate that the nihilistic elements of Cobain's life and art were so widely and readily embraced by a Pied Piper-following cadre of Kurtophiles bent on viewing self-destruction as ennobling. Nirvana never aspired to be the anti-heroic role models that certain hopeless souls among us needed them to be. To m... See More

Nirvana Concert Films

  • Classic Album: Nevermind

    Nirvana

    Year: 2004

    Runtime: 49 min

    "Nevermind" was the second album from the Seattle trio and the first on the DGC label (it's predecessor "Bleach" was released on the Sub Pop label). It was produced by Butch Vig (also the drummer for the band Garbage) and mixed by Andy Wallace. Nirvana's surviving members Krist Novoselic (bass) and Dave Grohl (drums) talk candidly about their past, the recording of Nevermind and about Kurt Cobain and the legacy that he has left behind. Also featured are exclusive interviews with the likes of Garry Gersh (A&R DGC Records), Butch Vig, Jonathan Ponneman and Nils Bernstein (Sub Pop Records), Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth), Jack Endino, and many more.
     
     
  • Kurt Cobain: About a Son

    Nirvana

    Year: 2006

    Runtime: 1 hr 37 min

    An intimate and moving meditation on the late musician and artist Kurt Cobain, based on more than 25 hours of previously unheard audiotaped interviews conducted with Cobain by noted music journalist Michael Azerrad for his book "Come As You Are: The Story of Nirvana." In the film, Kurt Cobain recounts his own life - from his childhood and adolescence to his days of musical discovery and later dealings with explosive fame - and offers often piercing insights into his life, music, and times. The conversations heard in the film have never before been made public and they reveal a highly personal portrait of an artist much discussed but not particularly well understood.
     
     
  • Live At Reading

    Nirvana

    Year: 1992

    Runtime: 1 hr 37 min

    Ranked #1 in Kerrang Magazine's "100 Gigs That Shook The World" and voted as "Nirvana's #1 Greatest Moment" by fans in an NME poll, Nirvana's historic August 30, 1992 stands as a watershed moment in the history of rock. While the show's centerpiece was a performance of nearly the entire Nevermind tracklist, also noteworthy were early performances of three as yet unrecorded songs which wouldn’t be released until 2 years later on In Utero: "All Apologies," "Dumb," and in its first ever public performance, "Tourettes." The career-spanning setlist also reached back to the band's 1989 Sub Pop debut album, Bleach, for "Blew," "About A Girl," "School," "Negative Creep" and first single "Love Buzz," and even further back to the mid-'80s for "Spank Thru." Other songs from the Reading set would appear in studio form on the Incesticide compilation later in the year: "Aneurysm," "Been A Son" and "Sliver." Additionally, the band played a pair of beloved covers by two bands that helped shape the formative Nirvana sound– "The Money Will Roll Right In" by Fang and "D-7" by The Wipers.
     
     
  • Live At The Paramount

    Nirvana

    Year: 1991

    Runtime: 1 hr 11 min

    Five weeks after releasing what was to become the seminal album of a generation, Nirvana was on a nationwide club and small theatre tour that brought them to Seattle’s Paramount Theatre for a very special Halloween 1991 homecoming show. Launching the nineteen song set with a brilliant cover of the Vaselines’ “Jesus Doesn’t Want Me For A Sunbeam,” the band tears through Nevermind hits like “Smells Like Teen Spirit,” “Lithium” and “Breed,” plus earlier favorites like “School,” “Love Buzz” and “About A Girl” and a very early version of “Rape Me.”
     
     
  • 1991: The Year Punk Broke

    Sonic Youth, Nirvana and The Ramones

    Year: 1991

    Runtime: 1 hr 38 min

    A visual document of Sonic Youth's 1991 European festival tour, which saw the aristocracy of the American Underground making their first inroads into the mainstream. Sonic Youth's lead singer Thurston Moore offers sardonic swipes at his band's position as the Royal Family of Alternative Rock, whilst a pre-'Nevermind' Nirvana skulk in the background, along with fellow courtesans Babes in Toyland, Dinosaur Jr, Gumball and The Ramones.
     
     

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