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4 Shows, 22 Tracks

Bob Marley

Since just about every human on the planet seems to own Legend, it's hardly necessary to describe the King of Reggae's music. Marley's style developed early under the tutelage of Lee Perry, who influenced Marley's phrasing. His voice graced early Ska, Rock Steady and Reggae recordings, but many believe that the time he spent backed by fellow Wailers Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingston was the most artistically satisfying of his career. The varied personal styles that the trio brought to recording sessions and live performances represented the culmination of Jamaican trio-style singing. Marley's soulful vocal leads were supported by Tosh's deep, almost angry diatribes, while Livingston (who later changed his name to Bunny Wailer) provided balancing high harmonies. The group added an R&B influence to slowed-down Ska, using vocal interplay similar to that of U.S. Doo-Wop and Soul acts. When backed by the Upsetters, one of Jamaica's hottest studio bands, the Wailers combined a tight vocal unit with exceptional rhythmic underpinning. That combination was responsible for Marley's first international smash Catch a Fire, as well as the brilliant, Lee Perry-produced African Herbsman. Later, Mar... See More

Bob Marley Concert Films

  • Exodus: Live at the Rainbow

    Bob Marley & the Wailers

    Year: 2017

    Runtime: 1 hr 11 min

    Bob Marley and The Wailers came to London's Rainbow Threatre in the summer of 1977. The Exodus album was riding the British Charts. The band's potent, magical music was everywhere; on the airwaves, the jukeboxes, the sound systems, hi-fi's. Bob Marley was one of the most evocative and charismatic performers of the Seventies, an artist whose songs have now worked their way into the very fabric of our times.
     
     
  • Classic Album: Catch a Fire

    Bob Marley and the Wailers

    Year: 1997

    Runtime: 1 hr

    In the late '60s, the notion that reggae would become more than just a novelty act would have been laughed at. To break into the mainstream, the movement needed a powerful voice of prophetic proportions. This voice emerged from the collective work of three pioneering friends from Jamaica, Peter Tosh, Bunny Wailer, and Robert Nesta Marley, who sought to bring about an ideological revolution through deeply meditative, hypnotic, and spiritual music. Catch a Fire was the Wailers' and reggae's introduction to the world and turned Bob Marley into a mega-icon of enormous proportions. It was the first album to remain true to the traditions of reggae music while having enough elements that were accessible to popular culture.
     
     
  • Freedom Road

    Bob Marley and the Wailers

    Year: 2007

    Runtime: 55 min

    He was and is, without doubt, Jamaica's finest export and in this film we can reveal for the first time the behind the scenes Bob Marley that only his closest confidantes could know. To help us understand a little more about this iconic Jamaican is his long time girlfriend and Oscar nominated actress Esther Anderson who describes in detail their life together at home in Hope Road as well as in London. Of all the people considered closest to him, Esther was probably the person who knew more about the man's innermost thoughts and fears than any; so much was she in tune with him she even helped to write some of his hit records. Also featured is the last interview he would ever give in the UK where journalist Kris Needs questions him about his foot injury (the injury that would eventually lead to the diagnosis of terminal cancer) and many other topics about which Marley held strong views. The DVD also reveals previously unseen home footage plus live performances including 'Lively Up Yourself' which was last seen performed in the 70's.
     
     
  • Live In Concert

    Bob Marley and the Wailers

    Year: 1979

    Runtime: 1 hr 3 min

    This film captures Bob Marley, one of the most influential figures in all of popular music, performing his most beloved songs. This film presentation collects performances of "No Women No Cry," "Get Up, Stand Up," "I Shot the Sheriff," and a dozen others taken from different concerts throughout Marley's legendary career. Archival footage from Marley's Jamaican funeral in 1981 adds a historical and tragic aspect to the moving concert footage. This is an outstanding film for any Marley enthusiast or popular music fan.
     
     

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